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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)
to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the
-- [laughter] but the title is "miracle at philadelphia." and that is not wrong. washington, of course, was the presiding officer of the convention. the american constitution was by accident and design. the delegates -- the first month, would there be a president, would be a council, with the president have an absolute veto? at the end of the month, none of these things for resolved. at some points, at the delegates would say, the 18th century equivalent of we are out of fear. washington would say, gentlemen, please stay. you did not walk out on the general. and stay for three months and finish the document. in historygreat if's is what if jefferson had been at philadelphia? it is interesting that two of america's greatest thinkers john adams and thomas jefferson were not at philadelphia. adams was the american minister to the court of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 bucks -- books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the
to washington? >> you asked if i would vote for john boehner so i don't know. i would vote for a republican speaker. let me mention since we're talking about the lack of bipartisan ship. congressman's budget which is an impressive budget it wasn't supported by his own party. so we need people that can come up with bipartisan solutions reach across the table. i'm in the center. he's so far to the left there is no coming home for him. he's not your father's democrat, he's not a john f. kennedy democrat. he's got his own agenda. >> where is the center you could shake hands with a democrat over the table? >> can i? >> yeah, which issue? >> there are plenty of issues. bringing the corporate tax rate down. i think it's a great idea that he came up with and prick supported -- president clinton supported that. >> i'm proud to have the support of president clinton who said the progressive version is the best and it was the budget that most invested in putting america back into the future business because it protects social security, medicare and makes america competitive internationally. so i think
of the assault that killed four americans including our ambassador. "washington post" saying it looks like a major security faile, arguing that this administration must answer questions sooner or later. "wall street journal" saying that the obama administration has tried to avoid account built and that questions loom over this election because the white house failed to resolve those questions. joining me is tucker carlson and julie radinski. both are fox news contributors. tucker, those are not two aligned editorial boards "washington post" and journal in particularly saying that the administration has been evasive, inconsistent, offering conflicting accounts about one of the most serious overseas defeats in recent years. where are we going to can on this on wednesday morning? >> let me point out that the "washington post" endorsed obama just last week. these are his friends ideologically and no honest person can look at what unfold in benghazi and not have questions unanswered and recognize there was dishonesty on the part of the administration. if the republicans maintain criminal of hou
. >>> how close? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. president obama has got a spring in his step this friday before the election propelled by a good week on the job and 171,000 new jobs in this morning's report. he's out there in ohio fighting the good fight. i only make predictions when people make me make them, but the trajectory, the momentum, now seems pro-obama. pennsylvania will hold, ohio looks good but close, and all the battlegrounds look winnable for the president. the huge question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybo
was in a book meeting in washington d.c. and looked at what the president did last time and needs to do this time. >> it was clear from the beginning that there would beative resistance from the republicans he did. but at the same time, i think he could have done more with respect to setting the right tone and showing some leadership and these are two areas that he has to focus on in his second term . reaching out to the business community and listening. and reacting to what he's being told and successly as difficult as it sometimes is and almost all of you in the room who had experience working with congress, that's the nature of the system. >> steve: i hope the system changes a bit and we get some stuff done for the next two years. >> brian: that woman walked in front. >> steve: didn't she know we were watching. >> gretchen: what was a factor in the tuesday election or a side show. the man who advised gary johnson and third party candidates here next. >> steve: look at the pilot's plane. it crashes and caught on camera. you can watch it. don't distribute. ♪ ♪ than that though, the
. >>> welcome back, everybody. you're watching our special coverage of the election live from washington, d.c. this morning. with less than 24 hours to go, the candidates are focusing on the biggest prizes. those elusive swing states. right now, cnn has pennsylvania lean obama but both campaigns are fighting for the key stone state. today president obama is deploying bill clinton there, for four campaign stops. just one day after mitt romney took the state in pennsylvania, the theme from "rocky." pat toomey is a republican senator from pennsylvania. he campaigned with both romney and paul ryan this weekend. he joins us this morning. nice to see you, sir. thanks for talking with us. >> good morning, thanks for having me. >> appreciate that. we've heard sort of mixed messages on the state of pennsylvania. so lay it out for me. listen to republicans, they say pennsylvania is definitely in play. if you talk to the democrats, david plouffe said it's a sign of desperation to talk about pennsylvania. let me play for you what he said and then we'll answer that on the other side. >> we have a great
the senate. >> white house correspondent brianna keilar is live from washington, d.c. for us this morning. brianna, speaker boehner seemed to be offering the president on olive branch earlier this week when he talked about the possibility of increasing revenue. but here he's taking a hard stance against tax increases. what does that say about the chances of a compromise? >> well, it may actually sound kind of like it's splitting hairs. but it's really two different things where he's talking about increasing tax rates. he says he's not okay with that. but he would be maybe okay, maybe amenable to increasing revenue. to bringing in more tax dollars, because there is a difference. and what he's saying is part of a chorus of conciliatory language that we're hearing from democrats and republicans on the hill. listen to more of what john boehner said in that interview. >> -- talk about all kinds of things we may disagree. i'm the most reasonable, responsible person here in washington. the president knows this. he knows that he and i can work together. the election's over. now it's time to get t
politicians in washington to control health care choices that women should be making for themselves. so, wisconsin, we know what change is. we know what the future requires. we don't need a big government agenda or a small government agenda. we need a middle class agenda that rewards hard work and responsibility. we don't need a partisan agenda. we need a common sense agenda that says, when we educate a poor child, we'll a. be better off we need a vision that says we don't just look out for yourself. we look out for one another. we look out for future generations. and we meet those obligations by working together. that's the change we believe in. that's what this election's all. now, let's be clear. achieving this agenda won't be easy. it's never been easy. we always knew that. back in 2008, when we talked about change i told you, i wasn't just talking about changing presidents. i wasn't just talking about changing parties. i was talking about changing our politics. i ran because the voices of the american people, your voice, had been shut out of our democracy for way too long. by lobby
. >> reporter: so the forecast for the next congress -- more of the same. athena jones, cnn, washington. >>> and cnn newsroom continues with fred. >> have a great day. >> i'm going to go home and turn back my clock before i forget. >> that's right. we'll see you an hour earlier tomorrow. thanks so much. appreciate that. the countdown is on indeed. election day is just three days away now. the presidential candidates are making a huge final push in the battleground states. today president obama campaigns in ohio, wisconsin, iowa and virginia. mitt romney stumping in new hampshire, iowa, and colorado. they're running mates are also going nonstop. vice president is in colorado and paul ryan is holding rallies in pennsylvania, virginia, florida, and ohio. so ohio indeed could be the biggest battleground of the election. the race there is very tight. a just released cnn/orc poll shows obama ahead by just three points, well within the margin of error. an nbc/"wall street journal" poll shows a wider gap with obama leading by six points. president obama is about to speak at a rally in mentor, o
sevillia, thank you for coming by. up next, we'll be joined by david londoner, washington bureau chief of "the los angeles times." -- david lauter. >> c-span invites middle and high school students to send a message to the president. send president obama a short video, what he should consider in 2013 for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. close c-span studentcam is open to students grades 6-12. for complete rules, and go online to studentcam.org. >> c-span programming is good because they tried to cover both sides of the issue. not getting into offering their own opinions. there are very comprehensive about covering the house and senate and different -- other centers here in d.c. that would not normally be exposed to. >> jeff wrigh clutchest c-span -- wright watches c-span. >> i want my [inaudible] to be intensely journalistic. these days, you will miss the thing sutter influencing yourself and everything else. >> tom wolfe it is live from miami book for international. his book "back to blood," and his take on the city of miami. >> "washington journal" continues. host: "los an
against human desire. back cannot work. i am a student at george washington university. there is a large push from the and the price of a community about legalization of marijuana. -- from the undergraduate timidity about legislation and marijuana. could this lead to a nationwide reform movement? >> it is different. i presume the undergraduate movement at gwi is people who want to get something. temperance movement was to deny somebody else opportunity to get something. the women's movement that was the firast mass move apart -- movement for prohibition was very noble. women were victimized by prohibition in horrible ways. women have no voting rights, the bourse was a rarity. -- women had no voting rights, divorce was a rarity. it was an effort to free the family, free women from this. it is hard to get my arms around comparison between that and an undergraduate desire for marijuana. >> most major changes in the country, from popular movements, some of them start on college campuses, some in other places. >> there is a meaningful parallel. it is generational. the same generation that is
that submitted those names, workers gathered those names is called field works. it's based in washington, d.c. a grassroots organization. they say they basically work with democratic candidates or progressive causes. the chairman of the republican party who is member of the election board there such voter fraud and voter registration fraud allegations undermine our democracy. >> any person would engage this that kind of conduct that serious toward democracy is highly irresponsible and potentially criminal. >> reporter: he said they don't tolerate any fraud. they gave us this statement. we have an employee who has reviewed every single card. we categorize them that are possibly incomplete and others that could be potentially fraudulent. we have a high standard here. if they are not hundred percent sure of the card we will flag it to the board of elections. one of the fired field workers in cincinnati says that she didn't do anything wrong. she told us she blames the people who tried to register. >> i probability would say, i was betrayed by some of the people. if you really didn't want to fi
weak and there are no signs of improvement going into the s&p. melissa: the make up in washington for the next four years remains pretty much the same but the future is anything but status quo. lori: that was interesting. looming budget cuts threaten defense companies but one analyst says it could be a winner in all of this. and investment for you. we get a call with oppenheimer a little later. let's look at the metals. so much talk about the markets and obama victory and ben bernanke staying in place and another day of gains for gold, $10.20, $17.24, silver and copper high. we're back after this. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, ojumping into the marke hgoes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. melissa: oil prices recovering from a
. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. the hurricane and this president. hemingway called it grace under pressure, the highly educated call it good government. the american people who count the most call president obama's handling of tropical storm sandy positive. 4 out of 5 give him good marks as first responder in the crisis. the question before the election is whether this huge story about disaster and executive response is the last big one before we vote. is it the october surprise? the black swan that swoops out of nowhere and changes everything? as scarlet o'hara said, there's always tomorrow. chuck todd is nbc's political director and john heilemann is "new york magazine's" national affairs editor and an msnbc analyst. i guess that's my question to start, but let me give you this first. the president this afternoon bagged a big endorsement, new york mayor mike bloomberg, who is always interesting to watch. he cited the president's stance on climate change as the major reason. he writes, quote, one believes a woman'
yard sign and i will reach across the aisle in washington to people of good faith with the other party. there's much more than our moment. it's america's moment of renewal and purpose and optimism. we journeyed far and wide in this great campaign for america's future and now we are almost home. i had an experience before i went to bed last night that touched me. i was at a rally in englewood, colorado. we had driven through a place called monument, colorado. we got someone from colorado here. there you go. it reminded me of something that happened many years before, which underscored my conviction that the american people will always rise to the occasion, something very special about the people of this land. we have within our hearts a desire to live for something bigger than ourself, our family, our faith, our community, our school, our nation. this was at a boy scout court of honor. any boy scouts here sniffs at the formica table there at this court of honor we give out eagle scouts to boys who earned them and i was at the end of the table next to the american flag and the scout mast
with the other yard sign. and i'll reach across the aisle in washington, to people who have good faith in the other party. there's much more than our moment. it's america's moment of rene l renewal, purpose and optimism. we've journeyed far and wide in this great campaign for america's future. and now, we're almost home. i had an experience before i went to bed last night that touched me. i was at a rally in inglewood, colorado. getting there, we drove through a place called monument, colorado. it reminded me of something that happened many years before, which underscored my conviction that the american people will always rise to the occasion. something very special about the people of this land. we have within our hearts a desire to live for something bigger than ourselves. our family, faith, community, school, our nation. this was at a boy scout court of honor. any boy scouters here? i was one of the leaders in the scouts. so, i was seated up front. one of the formica tables up there. i was next to the american flag. and the scout master who was speaking to the boys was the scout le
of power." it's no longer forthcoming, it is here. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. good morning, andrea. >> hi there. >> john heilemann, it's been such a long, long road since you guys started reporting on president barack obama -- then-senator barack obama's first election campaign in 2007. here we are five years later, a very emotional moment for the president who has endured five years of the highest highs and the lowest lows in politics. this has to be one of the most special moments for the man. >> undoubtedly. you know, it will be -- you think about the significance of him winning the first time, obviously, an historic moment. but in a lot of ways, you know, if he had lost on tuesday night, there would have been a lot of people who kind of consigned that victory to an accident. >> he would have been an aberration of history. >> almost re-election means as much and maybe in some ways more than the first time, you know. he's not a guy given to public emotion, displays of emotion. back in 2008
picture from the ronald reagan building in washington, where we will continue our live coverage of a post-election discussion and analysis, "cq" ."oll call live coverage starting at about 1 pop 45 eastern. while we wait, we're keeping an eye on tweeds that reporters are posting about the election. again, coverage of the "cq" "roll call" discussion coming up. right now, war on the election and what is next for congress on to de's "washington journal." reporter roundtable with margaret talev from bloomberg news and scott wilson from "the washington post." here is your special coverage from this morning. what is next? what is the first item for the second obama administration? guest: the first question is the so-called fiscal cliff, which no one wants the country to go over but no one as a way to fix. the president will spend most of the next year working on that. he will have staff issues to work on with turnover in his cabinet, and the senior levels in the west wing as well. things he will take on first. host: margaret talev, what did you hear from him wednesday about negotiations on the f
7% for the last month. largely because concerns about the standoff in washington over how to deal with the fiscal cliff. well talk about all of these issues at play with two special guest hosts. wharton professor of finance jeremy siegel and trusted american businessman steve forbes. both onset and ready to start this discussion at 6:00. first, though, andrew has a few of the top business headlines. >>> let's talk about some of the headlines this morning. cisco systems buying cloud network start up meraki for $1.2 billion in cash. it was founded in 2006 by members of m.i.t.'s laboratory for computer science. joe, i don't know if you take credit for any of that. bp plans to spend up to $5.9 billion buying back stock. last week the oil giant agreed to pay record criminal penalties over the deepwater horizon disaster. and americans are carrying more credit card debt and being less diligent about making on time payments. trans union now reporting that average credit card debt for borrowers grew 4.9% in the third quarter and meantime the rate of credit card payments at least 93 days ov
. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking about contraception or ever was before the committee at the time, that is an image of perjury is exactly why republicans are having a hard time in connecting with female voters in that gender gap. >> romney did significantly improve among white women. not only did not college white women, but also the college white women. this is the first time the democrats have lost them since 1988. >> there is also of the marriage gap. if you are a married woman, you vote different in different ways. that is another thing the republican party is facing. there is new to an era where you bought your identity rather than your interest. >>
for themselves, for example, that politicians in washington, mostly men shouldn't be controlling healthcare choices that women can make perfectly well for themselves. [cheers and applause] >> for eight years we had a president who shared these beliefs, a guy named bill clinton. [cheers and applause] >> and so our beliefs were put to the test. his economic plan asked the wealtheist americans to pay a little bit more so we could continue to invest in our people, continue to invest in ideas, and inc inventory no sraeugss, invest in our infrastructure. at the time a republican congressman and senate candidate by the name of mitt romney. [booing ] >> no, no, don't boo, vote. vote. voting is the best revenge. at the time mitt romney said bill clinton's plan would hurt the economy and kill jobs. turns out his math back then was just as bad as it is today. [cheers and applause] >> because by the end of president clinton's second term america created 23 million new jobs and incomes were up and poverty was down and our deficit became the biggest surplus in history. so, our ideas were tried and tested
would be most likely to blame washington and president obama. they're most likely to vote democratic. people who do not have jobs who are struggling and not earning sufficient income seem much more likely to gravitate toward a party with a safety net. people who have jobs and are doing well are more likely to be skeptical of government activity. >> thank you very much. it's the final 100 hours of the campaign. right now president obama and governor romney are both in ohio about to hold campaign events. up next we check in with the political panel. their thoughts on what we see playing you out. running into controversy, new york's decision to move ahead with this week's marathon has sparked a lot of backlash. >> the city of new york is talking about getting water out of the battery tunnel and prepares for a marathon. we're pulling bodies out of the water. >> we feel so strongly that this is the right thing to do for the city of new york, and that this can only be and must only be the starting place of our support. >> so what does your gut tell you? do you support the decision that the
, woman and child in greece. today voters could make washington state the first state to make and use and sell marijuana. you would have to be over 21 to buy over a licensed dealer. the federal government can challenge the legality. >> brian: candidates, convincing the american people is half of the battle. they have to convince 535 memberings of congress to take their side, too. who better to do the job. back to the political panel who experienced that for themselves x. first of all for the middle of gridlock, how do we break it can they do. >> if romney gets elected you start with a new day. the republicans would try to move something forward and if the president gets reelected you start where you are today with a lot of the grid lock. >> brian:ent senator baye. you said no one was doing anything. do you see it changing if president obama gets another four years. >> i think he will think about his legacy and there is a chance and he will probably move to the middle and embrace the simpson-bowles report and make compromises with the entitlement reform. my guess he would be willing to
, thank you for coming in. roll call house editor. that is it for "washington journal." nancy pelosi is giving a press conference in a few moments on c-span 2. we will now join the house which is in session. day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate . the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11: 50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from illinois, mr. quigley, for five minutes. mr. quigley: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, an estimated 50,000 people die every year as a result of seize years. some of -- seizures. some of these victims are like danny stanton. chicago's mike and mary stanton founded the danny foundation after their 4-year-old son, danny
out of. for example, we think that folks in washington, especially men, should not try to control health care choices that women are perfectly capable of making themselves. >> now, madison, we had a president that shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. when he first came into office, his economic plan asked the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more so we could reduce our deficit and still invest in the skills and ideas of our people, and at the time the republican congress and a certain senate candidate by the name of mitt romney said bill clinton's plan would hurt the economy, would kill jobs, would hurt the job creators. does this sound familiar? turns out his math back then was just as bad as it is now. because by the end of president clinton's second term, america created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up. port was down. our deficit had turned into a surplus. so, wisconsin, our ideas have been tested. we've tried them. they worked. the other side's ideas have also been tested. they didn't work so well. after bill clinton left office during most of the last
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)

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